Monthly Archives: November 2012

Roxas 8

Love of art in his veins
With many people in Basey engaged in mat weaving, it came as no surprise that there is now a scarcity of the raw material. Lilio reveals that they have to procure tikog from some Leyte towns like Mayorga, Abuyog, MacArthur and Sta. Fe, among others, to augment the supply that they acquire locally.

Posted on: 04 Nov 2012
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Roxas 7

A tradition lives on
Mat weaving is an old cottage industry of Basey, with many of its villages engaged in the craft. In Barangay Bacubac, some three kilometers northwest of the town proper, old women spend the day weaving banig inside their nipa huts, while their husbands prepare the tikog materials they will use.

Posted on: 04 Nov 2012
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Roxas 6

The tikog stems are first cut according to the desired length and then dried under the sun. Some of these stems are dyed with the desired color and again dried. Then these are flattened just before they are woven into mats. Lilio reveals that they have 34 barangay coordinators who are ready to help them procure woven mats in the town’s more than 50 villages whenever there is a big order for the tikog mat from exporters and other buyers.

Posted on: 04 Nov 2012
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Roxas 5

The reed plant thrives well in densely forested areas and grows even in the rice fields. Fully grown tikog reaches up to three meters. Its width ranges from the finest at 1.5 mm. up to 6 mm. The weavers of Basey use the finer tikog.

Posted on: 04 Nov 2012
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Roxas 4

The raw material used in mat weaving in Basey comes from a reed plant locally known as tikog (Fimbristylis utilis), which belongs to the family Cuperaceae and has solid, jointless and usually triangular stems.

Posted on: 04 Nov 2012
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Roxas 3

Solid, jointless reed
The people in Basey had been weaving mats long before the Spaniards came, it was said. The tradition went on with almost all, if not all, of the womenfolk here learning the art of weaving at an early age. The weavers are locally known as “paraglara.”

Posted on: 04 Nov 2012
Posted by: admin
Roxas 2

This is because use of the banig has expanded. Where once the age-old mat was used solely for sleeping, it now adorns modern walls or ceiling panels. It has been turned into bags, throw pillows, framed decors, as well as place mats and furniture matting.

Posted on: 04 Nov 2012
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Roxas 1

The traditional art of mat weaving continues to flourish in this old town whose name has become synonymous with woven sleeping mat, or “banig.”
And the practice of this ancient art, which has been handed down from one generation to the next, recently took a new turn as demand for the product increases.

Posted on: 04 Nov 2012
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Puerto 12

The current name of the game is banig – for environmental relevance, sustainability.

Posted on: 03 Nov 2012
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Puerto 11

The country has a great resource of raw materials ideal for mat weaving.

Posted on: 03 Nov 2012
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Banig, a native handwoven mat made from an indigenous reed named tikog (Fimbristylis utilis), is usually used for sleeping. Overtime, it has been used in other forms like native bags, throw pillows, place mats, framed art works, and it now adorns modern walls panels, furniture mattings and even used in designer clothings.